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Thousands Who Survived Hurricane Katrina and Rebuilt in Baton Rouge Have Lost Everything Again

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When Hurricane Katrina leveled New Orleans, thousands of people left behind their ruined homes and took refuge here. They found new jobs and rebuilt their homes. Slowly, things started to feel normal again.

But then a nameless storm brought unprecedented flooding to Baton Rouge and a wide swath of southern Louisiana over the last week. Countless Katrina survivors have been left, for a second time, with nothing.

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“Everything was going good,” said Trinice Rose, a nurse who escaped her home near Baton Rouge on foot as the floodwater rose — 11 years to the month after her home in New Orleans’s Ninth Ward was drowned under more than nine feet of water. “Now, again, we’re back where we started.”

Two displacements, two traumas. A loss that has left many feeling tired, battered and hopeless. And even as many face unclear futures and questions about where they will live, experts say they are also concerned about the mental health consequences for Katrina survivors now weathering this new loss.

The historic flooding that is battering Louisiana has left at least 13 dead, state officials said. Another 30,000 people have been rescued and 40,000 homes have been damaged.

An unknown number of people remain missing nearly a week after the rain began to fall. Scores of firefighters, police officers and other first responders fanned out across the region this week to begin a massive search-and-rescue mission that authorities said could last for up to two weeks.

“Nobody has been forgotten,” Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards (D) said at a briefing this week. “We understand there are a lot of people who are suffering.”

Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson will visit Louisiana on Thursday to review the response and address reporters, a spokeswoman for the department said.

Many in the flooded area and across the country have questioned why this devastation — which the American Red Cross called the country’s worst natural disaster since Hurricane Sandy in 2012 — has not received more attention from national media outlets, politicians and government officials.

In an editorial published Wednesday night, the Advocate newspaper in Baton Rouge called on President Obama — who is vacationing in Martha’s Vineyard, Mass. — to visit the shaken region.

“We’ve seen this story before in Louisiana, and we don’t deserve a sequel,” the editorial stated. “In 2005, a fly-over by a vacationing President George W. Bush became a symbol of official neglect for the victims of Hurricane Katrina. The current president was among those making political hay out of Bush’s aloofness. … It’s past time for the president to pay a personal visit, showing his solidarity with suffering Americans.”

Obama declared the flooding a major disaster on Sunday, opening up federal funding for 20 parishes, and the White House said he has been receiving regular updates since this weekend.

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SOURCE: Emma Brown, Ashley Cusick and Mark Berman 
The Washington Post

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Dallas

Bodycam video released of Andre Leshon Lee who lost consciousness when arrested but died 5 days later in Dallas PD custody, Report

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The Dallas Police Department has released a video of Andre Leshon Lee who they say lost consciousness shortly after being taken into custody on August 28. The video released clearly shows he lost consciousness at the site where he was arrested.

The report goes on to say Lee died September 2 in police custody a week after losing consciousness. Something doesn’t add up here.

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According to Fox 4 the investigation by Dallas police into Lee’s death, he and his wife were driving the night of August 28, when his wife said he got out of the car and started running.

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Morehouse School of Medicine students get surprise news that $26M gift will help pay off their debt

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ATLANTA — It’s a major gift to an Atlanta-based historically Black college aimed at helping close the gap in medical disparities in America.

On Wednesday, Morehouse School of Medicine announced they received a $26.3-million donation from Bloomberg Philanthropies, the organization founded by former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg. 

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Apalachee Elementary assistant principal Nikki Bradley under fire for monkey post about black students

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According to WCTV Leon County school administrators, Thursday publicly detailed the investigation of an assistant principal’s Facebook post that lead to a reprimand and demotion.

The district received multiple complaints about the post by Apalachee Elementary assistant principal Nikki Bradley.

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Bradley wrote this message on her personal Facebook page:

“For a while now, I have felt like Ringmaster of the ****show. Today has done me in! I do not want to be ringmaster, someone come get the monkeys and all the circus friends.

#exhausted #goawaycovid #imgoingtobed”

“It’s important to clarify for the record what took place, the investigation that happened, and what discipline we have enforced,” said Superintendent Rocky Hanna in a Facebook live on Thursday.

The district’s Director of Labor and Employee Relations, Deana McAllister, says an investigation determined the post “was not meant to be divisive or hurtful, nor racially motivated.”

McAllister says the post did show a lack of professionalism and poor judgement, leading to a formal reprimand and demotion of Bradley. She was reassigned from Apalachee Elementary to Killearn Lakes.

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