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Mitch Mayfield, a 23 soldier killed in Kenya attack identified by family

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The Pentagon has identified the U.S. soldier killed in an al-Shabab attack in Kenya on Sunday.

Army Spc. Henry “Mitch” Mayfield Jr., 23, died while supporting Operation Octave Shield, the name for the mission focused on targeting militant groups in Somalia, the Pentagon said.

He was killed during an attack that included mortars and small arms fire, breached the base’s perimeter and damaged six aircraft. There was no immediate information released regarding how Mayfield was killed during the attack.

Mayfield was assigned to 1st Battalion, 58th Aviation Regiment, 164th Theater Airfield Operations Group, out of Fort Rucker, Alabama. His battalion provides expeditionary air traffic control and airfield management.

Mayfield and two DoD contractors died after the attack on Manda Bay Airfield, which is roughly 150 miles south of the Kenya-Somalia border. Two other Defense Department members were also injured in the attack, but remain in stable condition, according to U.S. Africa Command.

“Our thoughts and prayers go out to Specialist Henry ‘Mitch’ Mayfield’s family, friends and loved ones,” said Col. William Garber, commander of the fallen soldier’s unit. “Mayfield was a dynamic soldier who inspired those he served with to excel both on and off duty. The 164th Theater Airfield Operations Group will miss his leadership and camaraderie.”

Mayfield, a native of Evergreen Park, Illinois, was assigned to 1st Battalion, 58th Aviation Regiment, 164th Theater Airfield Operations Group in Fort Rucker, Alabama. The DOD said Mayfield was in Kenya supporting Operation Octave Shield. No further details have been released. U.S. authorities are investigating this incident.

Mayfield is a native of the Chicago, Illinois suburb Hazel Crest. He enlisted into the Army in August 2017. His mother, Carmoneta, said that she last spoke with her son during the New Year’s holiday.

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Civil rights icon Rev. Joseph E. Lowery dies at 98

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The Rev. Joseph E. Lowery, who has been called the dean of the civil rights movement, died Friday, The King Center said.

Lowery, 98, was a co-founder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference with the Rev. Martin Luther King.

The Joseph and Evelyn Lowery Institute for Justice & Human Rights said he died peacefully at 10 p.m. surrounded by his daughters at home.

“Hailed as the ‘Dean of the Civil Rights Movement’ upon his receipt of the NAACP’s Lifetime Achievement Award, Dr. Lowery had assumed and executed a broad and diverse series of roles over the span of his nine decades: leader, pastor, servant, father, husband, freedom fighter and advocate,” the institute said in a statement.

Lowery, who delivered the benediction in President Barack Obama’s inauguration in 2009, was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by Obama later that year.

“Born and raised in Jim Crow Alabama, preaching in his blood, the Rev. Joseph Lowery is a giant of the Moses generation of civil rights leaders,” Obama said at the ceremony. “It was just King, Lowery and a few others, huddled in Montgomery, who laid the groundwork for the bus boycott and the movement that was to follow.”

Rev. Dr. Joseph E. Lowery attends Grounded in History, Soaring into the Future: Rev. Joseph E. Lowery’s 94th Birthday Celebration at Delta flight Museum in Atlanta, Georgia on Oct. 6, 2015.Paras Griffin / Getty Images file

He was born in Huntsville, Alabama, on October 6, 1921, and in the 1950s, he headed the Alabama Civic Affairs Association, the organization that led the movement to desegregate buses and public accommodations, according to the Joseph & Evelyn Lowery Institute.

In 1965, King picked Lowery to chair the delegation delivering the demands of the Selma-to-Montgomery march to Alabama’s governor, George Wallace.

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Coronavirus live updates: Italy’s death toll climbs over 9,000

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A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed over 26,000 people around the world.

Globally there are more than 576,000 diagnosed cases of COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University.

The United States has over 94,000 cases of COVID-19, the highest number in the world.

There have been at least 1,438 deaths in the U.S. More than 1,000 people have died in the past week alone.

At least 813 people in the U.S. have recovered.

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Rev. Jesse Jackson endorses Bernie Sanders

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Rev. Jesse Jackson, Civil rights activist and former Democratic presidential candidate endorsed Sen. Bernie Sanders on Sunday.

Jackson listed 13 reasons why he’s supporting Sanders in a statement Sunday which includes funding for HBCU’s, national voting rights, a civil rights commission, a wealth tax, a two-state solution for Palestine and Isreal, and a single-payer health care system.

In 1988 Jackson went head to head with Biden when both ran for president. Jackson said that the former vice president’s campaign did not reach out to him or ask for his support.

Sanders endorsed Jackson’s campaign during the 1988 presidential election.

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