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Black Children Are Being Threatened For Taking a Knee in Protest

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In the 1950s and 60s, civil rights leaders learned a powerful lesson and put it to good, painful work. It changed our country immeasurably and ultimately ushered in the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

On streets, on buses, at lunch counters, at train stops and even on the doorsteps of elementary, middle and high schools — people, particularly young people, quietly and peacefully protested inequity, injustice and inhumane segregation. The protests were orderly and dignified. Students were consistently respectable and peaceful.

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The plan was to show the world that the spirit of white supremacy, which served as the foundation of Jim Crow segregation and oppression, would act out with horrific ugliness if its limits were tested even a little bit. Their hypothesis was proven right.

Peaceful, beautiful protestors, ranging from children to old women, were beaten with sticks and clubs as they crossed the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma. They were violently sprayed with full strength fire hoses and bitten by vicious police dogs under the direction of Birmingham Commissioner of Public Safety Eugene “Bull” Connor. Four little girls had their bodies blown to bits by a bomb at the 16th Street Baptist Church. In Greensboro and Nashville, mean-spirited whites would smile and laugh as they dumped milkshakes on the heads of protestors quietly sitting at the segregated Woolworth’s lunch counters. Tax-paying black folk who built up the nerve to go and vote would be told to recite the Constitution or guess how many bubbles were in a bar of soap.

When the family of 6-year-old Ruby Bridges honored the request of the NAACP for her to integrate William Frantz Elementary School in Louisiana, what happened next defied all logic. White families began removing their kids from the school. Only one teacher, a transplant from Boston, would agree to teach her and ended up being forced to teach her in a classroom all by herself.

Protesters consistently showed up to yell and scream obscenities at the little girl. She began praying every day as armed security escorted her through the hateful mob. One woman threatened to poison Ruby — forcing the child to only eat and drink food she bought from home. Another woman brought a black baby doll in a coffin to the protests. Her father lost his job. Her family was banned from the local grocery store. Her grandparents were kicked off of the land where they were sharecroppers.

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Source: New York Daily News | Shaun King

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Dallas

Bodycam video released of Andre Leshon Lee who lost consciousness when arrested but died 5 days later in Dallas PD custody, Report

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The Dallas Police Department has released a video of Andre Leshon Lee who they say lost consciousness shortly after being taken into custody on August 28. The video released clearly shows he lost consciousness at the site where he was arrested.

The report goes on to say Lee died September 2 in police custody a week after losing consciousness. Something doesn’t add up here.

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According to Fox 4 the investigation by Dallas police into Lee’s death, he and his wife were driving the night of August 28, when his wife said he got out of the car and started running.

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Morehouse School of Medicine students get surprise news that $26M gift will help pay off their debt

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ATLANTA — It’s a major gift to an Atlanta-based historically Black college aimed at helping close the gap in medical disparities in America.

On Wednesday, Morehouse School of Medicine announced they received a $26.3-million donation from Bloomberg Philanthropies, the organization founded by former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg. 

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Apalachee Elementary assistant principal Nikki Bradley under fire for monkey post about black students

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According to WCTV Leon County school administrators, Thursday publicly detailed the investigation of an assistant principal’s Facebook post that lead to a reprimand and demotion.

The district received multiple complaints about the post by Apalachee Elementary assistant principal Nikki Bradley.

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Bradley wrote this message on her personal Facebook page:

“For a while now, I have felt like Ringmaster of the ****show. Today has done me in! I do not want to be ringmaster, someone come get the monkeys and all the circus friends.

#exhausted #goawaycovid #imgoingtobed”

“It’s important to clarify for the record what took place, the investigation that happened, and what discipline we have enforced,” said Superintendent Rocky Hanna in a Facebook live on Thursday.

The district’s Director of Labor and Employee Relations, Deana McAllister, says an investigation determined the post “was not meant to be divisive or hurtful, nor racially motivated.”

McAllister says the post did show a lack of professionalism and poor judgement, leading to a formal reprimand and demotion of Bradley. She was reassigned from Apalachee Elementary to Killearn Lakes.

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